Ocular Nutrition Society to hold symposium in conjunction with Vison Expo East

March 4, 2014

The Ocular Nutrition Society (ONS) has announced the schedule for its education symposium, to be held Sunday, March 30, 2014, at the Jacob Javits Conference Center in New York City, in conjunction with Vision Expo East.

The Ocular Nutrition Society (ONS) has announced the schedule for its education symposium, to be held Sunday, March 30, 2014, at the Jacob Javits Conference Center in New York City, in conjunction with Vision Expo East.

Scientists from Tufts University and other institutions will present the latest science, ranging from genetic influences on ocular disorders to the role of lutein in brain function to the challenges of conducting nutrition research studies. ONS members and all attendees of Vision Expo are welcome to participate in this day-long forum.

For registration information, contact info@ocularnutritionsociety.org or visit www.ocularnutritionsociety.org.

The schedule is as follows: 

9am-10am

Nutrigenetics of Eye Disease, Johanna Seddon, MD

The science of genetics is expanding rapidly and especially in the area of nutrigenetics: the role of nutrition in gene expression. This course will review the current scientific role of nutrition and how it affects gene expression in eye disease.

10am-11am

The Role of Lutein in Visual Function, Randy Hammond PhD

The fact that lutein and zeaxanthin influence visual function has been known for decades and has allowed the non-invasive measurement of these pigments using psychophysical techniques. This talk focuses on some of the mechanisms for these visual effects and their ecological significance.

11am-12pm

Early Detection of Macular Degeneration Structure and Function: Can we Prevent Vision Loss? Dorothy Hitchmoth, OD

Multi-spectral imaging and macular pigment optical density are revolutionary technologies that promise to help clinicians examine the retina in a novel way. This session will focus on these instruments with the potential to change the course of AMD.

12pm-1pm

Lunch

1pm-2pm

Evidence-based Nutrition and the Problem of Proof, Jeffrey Blumberg, PhD

Unlike drugs, dietary components work in complex networks, are homeostatically controlled, and cannot be contrasted to a true placebo. Although randomized trials present one approach toward understanding the efficacy of nutrient interventions, the complexities of nutrient interactions cannot always be adequately addressed through a single research design.

2pm-3pm

The Emerging Role for Lutein in the Brain, Elizabeth J. Johnson, PhD

There is a variety of evidence to support a role for lutein in vision. Lutein’s role in cognition has only recently been considered. This session will focus on the evidence to support a role for lutein in cognitive function throughout the lifespan.

3pm-4pm

Bringing Nutrition Knowledge to Practice, Michael Cooney, MD

Nutrition and vitamin supplementation play a very real role for slowing AMD progression.  This session will focus on the AREDS 1 and 2 results and how they can be applied to patients with AMD in clinical practice.

4pm-5pm

Cabernet, Chocolate and Chatter social hour