B+L report finds resistance of some ocular pathogens has increased in U.S.

May 12, 2014

During the ARVO meeting last week, Bausch + Lomb researchers presented results from the 5th Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular Microorganisms (ARMOR) surveillance study in the United States, as well as the first data from the study in Canada.

Orlando, FL-During the ARVO meeting last week, Bausch + Lomb researchers presented results from the 5th Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular Microorganisms (ARMOR) surveillance study in the United States, as well as the first data from the study in Canada. 

For the U.S. study, participants from 27 sites collected 239 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Haemophilus influenzae, all organisms frequently implicated in bacterial infections of the eye, and tested them for susceptibility to as many as 16 available ophthalmic antibiotics. From 2012 to 2013, the report found that antibiotic resistance rates increased among the isolates of staphylococci and P. aeruginosa. Preliminary results show non-susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and imipenem may have doubled from 2012 to 14% and 21%.

"The ARMOR study provides susceptibility information that may be useful in antibiotic selection and ocular infection management while keeping the issue of evolving antibiotic resistance itself top-of-mind for the eye care professional.  Because ineffective antibiotic therapy may not only be sight-threatening but also hastens the development of treatment resistant strains of bacteria, we all bear some responsibility for continued vigilance regarding resistance patterns and care in therapeutic selection,” said Mitchell A. Jackson, MD, Founder and Medical Director of Jacksoneye, Lake Villa, IL.