Lid hygienist course helps doctors, techs partner to treat blepharitis with new technology

March 20, 2015

At the recent SECO meeting, optometrists and ophthalmic technicians sat side by side learning to perform microblepharoexfoliation (MBE), a new therapy for the treatment of blepharitis and ocular surface disease. The program aimed to train both doctor and tech about blepharitis and how to use the BlephEx device.

Dr. Kabat demonstrates the use of BlephEx.

Atlanta, GA-At the recent SECO meeting, optometrists and ophthalmic technicians sat side by side learning to perform microblepharoexfoliation (MBE), a new therapy for the treatment of blepharitis and ocular surface disease. The program aimed to train both doctor and tech about blepharitis and how to use the BlephEx device.

The course, hosted by BlephEx, debuted the company’s lid hygienist certification program. I and company founder James Rynerson, MD, served as faculty.

Dr. Rynerson sees technicians who receive training rising to the position of certified lid hygienist, a skilled paraprofessional who aids the doctor in delivering care, much in the way that a dental hygienist participates in dental practice.

Related: A new tool for managing ocular surface disease

Blepharitis is a pervasive problem for our patients today, and it is one of the most common contributory factors in the development and acceleration of ocular surface disease.

MBE represents a simple yet highly efficacious form of therapy, directed at the root cause of this condition-namely, the overgrowth of bacterial pathogens on the surface of the eyelids.

Dr. Rynerson, who invented the BlephEx device, envisions the management of ocular surface disease much like dentists view proactive oral wellness.


“Regular removal of bacterial biofilms is the key to restoring and maintaining ocular surface health,” he said. “Having a certified technician available to perform MBE allows for more efficient use of the doctor’s time and streamlines the process of incorporating BlephEx into any practice.”

Following a discussion of blepharitis and the role of bacterial biofilm in ocular surface disease, participants witnessed a live demonstration of the MBE procedure and then took part a workshop with hands-on training with myself and Dr. Rynerson.

Additional lid hygienist courses are planned, with the first taking place in New York City April 21, 2015. Get more information.

Dr. Kabat is a professor at the Southern College of Optometry, a member of the Optometry Times Editorial Advisory Board, and a paid consultant for BlephEx.