Newest trends in clinical practice

July 1, 2010

Clinical practice is changing right in front of our eyes.

Editor's note: International Vision Expo East and West are among the leading resources for continuing education, clinical equipment and supplies, and the latest merchandise for optical dispensaries. The Vision Expos are a combined "fashion event and medical meeting." The Advanstar Eye Health Group-including Ophthalmology Times and Optometry Times-is proud to support the Vision Expos' mission to enhance the eye-care profession.

We are measuring tear osmolarity to determine the presence of ocular surface disease and the "prescribing" of nutraceuticals for many of these same conditions is growing daily. Scanning computerized ophthalmic diagnostic imaging is becoming de rigueur in optometric offices, while diabetic and hypertensive patients are being monitored photographically, as well as clinically, on a routine basis.

Aging population, growing concerns

Several studies, including the CATT study, the HARBOR trial, the VIEW 1 and View 2 studies, will soon give us more answers to the growing concern of an aging population and AMD. Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) treatments are already being modified based on the results of the PrONTO study. Combination treatments with anti-VEGF agents and photodynamic therapy may actually allow similar results as anti-VEGF only but with fewer applications.

Never before has the relationship between clinical ophthalmology and optometry been better. Nearly all optometrists have excellent relationships with a handful of specialists and patient care benefits from these relationships.

Referral centers for other than surgical care have begun to outgrow their need that existed back in 1974 when the original OMNI referral center was founded in Atlanta by a partnership with the Southern College of Optometry and a handful of Georgia optometrists. Today, optometrists simply treat those conditions themselves or refer the patient to an ophthalmic subspecialist directly.