A real-world approach to CL care

June 1, 2012

Compliance with contact lens care regimens in very low.

Key Points

Compliance with contact lens care regimens is very low-and, with a higher rate of lens-related complications among non-compliant wearers, the consequences of this are very real. (Cont Lens Anterior Eye. 2011; 34:216-222)

Teach compliance

To make compliance easier, we actually bundle solution and replacement cases with patients' contact lens orders. If they are following our instructions, they should run out of supplies at about the same time they need more contact lenses. I explain to patients that adherence to these guidelines will reduce their risk of infection and allow them to continue wearing contact lenses safely and comfortably.

Plan for noncompliance

Until recently, contact lens care products have been somewhat lacking in this regard. Multipurpose solutions (MPS) are easy to use, but the "no rub" wording on the packaging of some of these products may actively discourage rubbing, which I consider to be a key step not only in mechanical removal of deposits, but also in keeping patients engaged in their lens care. Most of our MPS products weren't tested on the most commonly prescribed lens materials, and disinfection efficacy was tested under laboratory conditions that are almost certainly not replicated by our patients on a day-to-day basis.

A new multipurpose disinfecting solution (MPDS), RevitaLens Ocutec (Abbott Medical Optics), addresses some of these problems. First, it has been designed and tested to be compatible with silicone hydrogel lenses. Considering that more than 50% (and growing) of my contact lens patients are now in silicone hydrogels, that's an important factor. It is labeled with a "rub and rinse" regimen that supports my clinical guidance to patients.