Study finds high vitamin C intake associated with decrease in lung cancer risk

October 17, 2014

After epidemiological studies on the association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer risk produced inconsistent results, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 21 studies to assess the association.

After epidemiological studies on the association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer risk produced inconsistent results, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 21 studies to assess the association.

Addressing AREDS2 controversies

Researchers analyzed 18 articles reporting 21 studies involving 8,938 lung cancer cases. The pooled results suggested that the highest vitamin C intake level vs. the lowest level was significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer especially in the United States and in prospective studies. The analysis found a linear dose-response relationship with the risk of lung cancer decreasing by seven percent for every 100 mg per day increase in the intake of vitamin C.

“Our analysis suggested that the higher intake of vitamin C might have a protective effect against lung cancer, especially in the United States, although this conclusion needs to be confirmed,” the authors wrote.